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What is a rookie San Antonian mistake?

We’ve all been there.

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We’ve all made those San Antonio mistakes before.

Photo by Frederick Gonzales

Whether you were born + raised in the 210 or a transplant from out of town, we have all made some rookie mistakes when it comes to the Alamo City.

Earlier this month, we asked our readers and Instagram followers what rookie mistake they’ve made in San Antonio. Hoping you would spare a new local from shame, here’s what you said:

Jennifer N. said, “I moved here from a mountainous area that cools down considerably at night. I went out at night in the middle of July dresses prepared for a cool mountain evening. Long sleeved black shirt, jeans and boots.” Ouch.

Sylvia L. pointed out, “Not knowing there are two Jones Maltsbergers (one is close to the airport and another intersects Thousand Oaks). Drove me nuts when I first started driving.” We didn’t know this either.

Check out Lisa B.'s morning commute, “A commute that goes through four school zones no matter which route I take.”

Our Instagram audience was way more vocal about one particular piece of advice (or warning), “Getting on 1604 — ever.”

One followers pointed out, “Speeding through Castle Hills or Shavano Park.” This is one to live by.

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